Dystrophy, Myotonic

National Organization for Rare Disorders, Inc.

Important
It is possible that the main title of the report Dystrophy, Myotonic is not the name you expected. Please check the synonyms listing to find the alternate name(s) and disorder subdivision(s) covered by this report.

Synonyms

  • Curschmann-Batten-Steinert syndrome
  • DM
  • myotonia atrophica
  • Steinert disease
  • dystrophia myotonia

Disorder Subdivisions

  • myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1)
  • myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2)

General Discussion

Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is an autosomal dominant, multi-system disorder that affects both smooth and skeletal muscles and may affect the central nervous system, heart, eyes, and/or endocrine systems. There are three types of DM1 that are distinguished by the severity of disease and age of onset. Mild DM1 is characterized by cataracts and sustained muscle contractions (myotonia). Classic DM1 is characterized by muscle weakness and wasting (atrophy), cataracts, myotonia and abnormalities in the heart's conduction of electrical impulses. Congenital DM1 is characterized by muscle weakness (hypotonia), difficulty breathing, mental retardation and early death.

DM1 is caused by an abnormality in the DMPK gene. Affected individuals have an increased number of copies of a portion of this gene called CTG. The greater the number of repeated copies of CTG, the more severe the disorder.

Myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2), formerly called proximal myotonic myopathy (PROMM) is an autosomal dominant disorder with symptoms that are similar to DM1, but tend to be milder and more variable than DM1. DM2 is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder caused by an abnormality in the ZNF9 gene on chromosome 3q. Affected individuals have an increased number of copies of a portion of this gene.

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Resources

Muscular Dystrophy Association
3300 E. Sunrise Dr
Tucson, AZ 85718
USA
Tel: (520)529-2000
Fax: (520)529-5300
Tel: (800)572-1717
Email: mda@mdausa.org
Internet: http://www.mda.org/

NIH/National Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Information Clearinghouse
1 AMS Circle
Bethesda, MD 20892-3675
USA
Tel: (301)495-4484
Fax: (301)718-6366
Tel: (877)226-4267
TDD: (301)565-2966
Email: NIAMSinfo@mail.nih.gov
Internet: http://www.niams.nih.gov/Health_Info

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)
P.O. Box 5801
Bethesda, MD 20824
Tel: (301)496-5751
Fax: (301)402-2186
Tel: (800)352-9424
TDD: (301)468-5981
Email: me20t@nih.gov
Internet: http://www.ninds.nih.gov/

International Myotonic Dystrophy Organization
PO Box 1121
Sunland, CA 91041-1121
USA
Tel: (760)918-0377
Fax: (760)444-2716
Tel: (866)679-7954
Email: info@myotonicdystrophy.org
Internet: www.myotonicdystrophy.org

MUMS National Parent-to-Parent Network
150 Custer Court
Green Bay, WI 54301-1243
USA
Tel: (920)336-5333
Fax: (920)339-0995
Tel: (877)336-5333
Email: mums@netnet.net
Internet: http://www.netnet.net/mums/

Genetic and Rare Diseases (GARD) Information Center
PO Box 8126
Gaithersburg, MD 20898-8126
Tel: (301)251-4925
Fax: (301)251-4911
Tel: (888)205-2311
TDD: (888)205-3223
Email: ordr@od.nih.gov
Internet: http://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/Default.aspx

Madisons Foundation
PO Box 241956
Los Angeles, CA 90024
Tel: (310)264-0826
Fax: (310)264-4766
Email: getinfo@madisonsfoundation.org
Internet: http://www.madisonsfoundation.org

Myotonic Dystrophy Support Group
35A Carlton Hill
Carlton
Nottingham, NG4 1BG
UK
Tel: 0115 987 5869
Fax: 0115 987 6462
Tel: 0115 9870080
Email: mdsg@myotonicdystrophysupportgroup.co.uk
Internet: http://www.mdsguk.org

Myotonic Dystrophy Foundation
10016 Foothills Blvd
Suite 130
Roseville, CA 95747-7198
USA
Tel: (916)788-2626
Fax: (916)788-2646
Tel: (866)968-6642
Email: info@myotonic.com
Internet: http://www.myotonic.com

Child Neurology Foundation
2000 West 98th Street
Bloomington, MN 55431
USA
Tel: (952)641-6100
Fax: (952)881-6276
Tel: (800)263-5430
Email: jstone@childneurologyfoundation.org
Internet: http://www.childneurologyfoundation.org

For a Complete Report

For a Complete Report

This is an abstract of a report from the National Organization for Rare Disorders, Inc. ® (NORD). A copy of the complete report can be obtained for a small fee by visiting the NORD website. The complete report contains additional information including symptoms, causes, affected population, related disorders, standard and investigational treatments (if available), and references from medical literature. For a full-text version of this topic, see http://www.rarediseases.org/search/rdblist.html

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