Type 1 Diabetes: Recently Diagnosed

Topic Overview

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This topic provides information about type 1 diabetes for adults and for parents of children who have been diagnosed with the disease in the past 6 weeks. If this topic doesn't answer your questions, one of the following topics may meet your needs.

What is type 1 diabetes?

Type 1 diabetes mellitus is a lifelong disease that develops when the pancreas can no longer produce insulin. Insulin lets sugar (glucose) enter your body's cells, where it is used for energy. Without insulin, sugar builds up in your blood. The level rises above what is safe for your body. Over time, high blood sugar levels can damage blood vessels and nerves throughout your body and increase your risk of eye, heart, blood vessel, nerve, and kidney disease.

Type 1 diabetes can develop at any age. But it usually develops in children and young adults. In the past, type 1 diabetes was called juvenile diabetes and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM).

What causes type 1 diabetes?

Insulin is made by certain cells (beta cells) in the pancreas. Type 1 diabetes develops because the body destroys the beta cells and therefore the pancreas's ability to produce insulin.

Some people inherit the risk for type 1 diabetes. But even these people may not develop type 1 diabetes unless other factors, such as exposure to certain viral infections, are present.1

What are the symptoms of high blood sugar and low blood sugar?

The main symptoms of high blood sugar from diabetes are:

  • Increased thirst.
  • Increased urination.
  • Weight loss.
  • Fatigue.
  • Increased appetite.

These symptoms usually develop over a few days to weeks. Some people have these symptoms before they are diagnosed, but they do not realize the symptoms are caused by diabetes. They may believe the symptoms are caused by the flu or some other illness.

When insulin levels drop very low, blood sugar can rise very high and a life-threatening situation called diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) can develop. DKA is an emergency. Symptoms include:

  • Flushed, hot, dry skin.
  • A strong, fruity breath odor.
  • Restlessness, drowsiness, or difficulty waking up. Young children may lack interest in their normal activities.
  • Rapid, deep breathing.
  • Loss of appetite, abdominal pain, and vomiting.
  • Confusion.

Severe diabetic ketoacidosis can cause difficulty breathing, brain swelling (cerebral edema), coma, or death. But by taking your insulin regularly and keeping your blood sugar levels in your target range, you can avoid DKA.

The main symptoms of low blood sugar from diabetes are:

  • Sweating (almost always present).
  • Nervousness, shakiness, and weakness.
  • Dizziness and headache.
  • Confusion and irritability.
  • Slurred speech.
  • Personality changes, such as anger or crying.

Low blood sugar occurs when the sugar (glucose) level in your blood drops below what your body needs to function normally. Not eating enough food or skipping meals, taking too much medicine (insulin), exercising more than usual, or taking certain medicines that lower blood sugar can cause your blood sugar to drop rapidly.

If your blood sugar level drops very low (usually below 20 mg/dL), you may lose consciousness or have a seizure. Eating or drinking something that contains sugar usually can bring your blood sugar back up to a safe level. But if you have symptoms of severe low blood sugar, you need medical care immediately.

What tests do I need for diabetes?

You need to test your blood sugar 3 or more times a day to make sure it falls within the target range you and your doctor set. You use a home glucose monitor to do these tests.

At first, you will keep in close touch with your doctor while finding the right dose of insulin that best keeps your blood sugar levels within your target range. When your blood sugar levels are staying within this range, you will continue to see your doctor about every 3 to 6 months. During these checkups, your doctor will look at your treatment to see how well it is controlling your diabetes. If your treatment isn't working very well, your doctor may have you try different things. You will also start having a hemoglobin A1c test to find out what your average blood sugar level was during the 2 to 3 months before your visit. This test checks your long-term blood sugar control.

You also need to have regular tests to check your blood pressure and cholesterol levels because high levels increase your risk of diabetes complications.

How is it treated?

You will take insulin injections daily or use an insulin pump. Treatment for type 1 diabetes focuses on keeping your blood sugar levels as close to normal as possible. This is called tight control. It is the best way to reduce your risk of diabetes complications. But some people—such as those whose blood sugar drops too low with tight control—may need to set a different target range with their doctor.

A normal to near-normal blood sugar level is 70 mg/dL to 130 mg/dL before eating or less than 180 mg/dL 1 to 2 hours after eating. It also may be measured as a hemoglobin A1c of 6% or less (normal) to 7% (near normal). This is a test of your blood sugar control for the past 2 to 3 months.

You also need to eat a healthful diet that spreads carbohydrate throughout the day, check your blood sugar 3 or more times a day, and get regular exercise. Because you have diabetes, you are at higher-than-average risk of a heart attack and stroke. You may take medicine to keep your blood pressure and cholesterol in the normal ranges. If you are 40 or older, you also may take aspirin to lower your risk for having a heart attack.

Your treatment plan may change based on your blood sugar levels and other test results reviewed in your doctor's office.

If your child has type 1 diabetes, treatment involves the same actions but also allows for normal growth and development.

You may find that soon after you are diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, your blood sugar levels return to normal. You are in what is called the "honeymoon period." The remaining insulin-producing cells in your pancreas are working harder to supply enough insulin for your body. You may take little or no insulin. But this does not mean that the disease is gone. After the remaining insulin-producing cells are destroyed, the honeymoon period ends, and you will need to take insulin for the rest of your life.

How will diabetes affect my life?

You can live a long, healthy life if you keep your blood sugar levels as close to normal as possible. This requires the right combination of food, physical activity, and insulin every day. If your young child has diabetes, you assume the responsibility for balancing these factors. As your child grows, he or she will take over more responsibility for his or her care.

Many people are afraid of giving themselves shots every day. With practice, it will become routine. Figuring out how to mix diet, insulin, and exercise in your daily life takes time. Don't get discouraged. Seek out help from your doctors if some part of diabetes care gives you trouble.

As you adjust to having diabetes, you will learn how to monitor your blood sugar level at home, give yourself insulin injections, recognize high and low blood sugar symptoms, count carbohydrate in your diet, and take precautions when you are sick. Diabetes care will become an important part of your life, but it doesn't have to take over your life.

Frequently Asked Questions

Learning about type 1 diabetes:

Being diagnosed:

Getting treatment:

Ongoing concerns:

Living with type 1 diabetes:

Cause

Type 1 diabetes develops because the body's defense system (immune system) tells the body to destroy the beta cells in the pancreas that make insulin. It's not known what causes this immune response. Some people inherit the risk for type 1 diabetes. But even these people may not develop type 1 diabetes unless other factors, such as exposure to certain viral infections, are present.

  • In infants and children, the beta cells usually are destroyed rapidly, resulting in a sudden rise in blood sugar level and a sudden onset of diabetes symptoms.
  • In adults, the cells often are destroyed more slowly, resulting in a slower rise in blood sugar level and a slower onset of diabetes symptoms.

Certain genes make a person more susceptible while other genes seem to protect the person from the disease. A complex interaction between a person's genes and some environmental factors, such as having enteroviral infections—especially Coxsackie B infections—may increase the risk of developing the disease, but it does not mean that the person will definitely develop the disease.

In the past, experts thought that vaccines caused diabetes. But studies have found no link between getting a vaccination and getting type 1 diabetes.2

Symptoms

Your (or your child's) symptoms of type 1 diabetes probably developed quickly, over a few days to weeks. These symptoms are caused by blood sugar levels rising above the normal range (hyperglycemia) and include:

  • Frequent urination, which may be more noticeable at night. If your child has already learned to use the toilet, he or she may have started wetting the bed during naps or at night. The kidneys are trying to get rid of the excess sugar in the blood. In order to do that, they have to excrete more water. More water means more urine.
  • Extreme thirst and a dry mouth. This happens if you lose, through frequent urination, enough water to become dehydrated.
  • Weight loss. This happens because you are dehydrated. Weight loss may also happen if you are losing all of those sugar calories in your urine instead of using them.
  • Increased hunger. You feel hungry because your body is not using all the calories that it can. Many of them are being excreted in urine.
  • Blurred vision. Your vision may blur when sugar builds up in the lens of your eye. The sugar sucks extra water into your eye, which changes the shape of the lens and blurs your vision.
  • Fatigue. You feel tired for the same reason you feel hungry. Your body is not using the calories you are eating, and your body is not getting the energy it needs.

All of these symptoms will get better or go away when your blood sugar levels are controlled.

If your blood sugar rose to very high levels at the time you were diagnosed with diabetes, you may have received treatment in a hospital for diabetic ketoacidosis, which is an emergency.

What symptoms might I have now?

Now that you are taking insulin injections, watch for signs of either high or low blood sugar. High blood sugar (hyperglycemia) usually develops slowly over a few days or weeks. But it can also develop quickly (in just a few hours) if you eat a large meal or miss an insulin dose. On the other hand, low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) can develop within 10 to 15 minutes. Children, especially very young children, are at greater risk for harm caused by very low blood sugar levels.

Watch for the following symptoms of high or low blood sugar. You (or your child) may not have the same symptoms every time, and you may have symptoms that are not listed.

What Happens

You may find that soon after you are diagnosed with type 1 diabetes your blood sugar levels return to normal. You are in what is called the "honeymoon period." The remaining insulin-producing cells in your pancreas are working harder to supply enough insulin for your body. You may take little or no insulin. But this does not mean that the disease is gone. After the remaining insulin-producing cells are destroyed, the honeymoon period ends, and you will need to take insulin for the rest of your life.

Treatment for your diabetes includes following a diet that spreads carbohydrate throughout the day, getting regular physical activity, Click here to view an Actionset.monitoring your blood sugar levels (using a home blood sugar meter), and taking insulin. By working closely with your doctor and following your prescribed treatment, you will feel better and have more control of your life. If your child has type 1 diabetes, treatment involves the same tasks but allows for normal growth and development.

Before diagnosis, your insulin level may have been low enough to cause severe high blood sugar, with symptoms such as confusion or even coma. This condition is called diabetic ketoacidosis and often requires treatment in a hospital. During your hospital stay, you are given insulin injections and fluids in a vein (intravenous or IV), and your condition is monitored closely. You are still at risk for this emergency in the future if you don't take enough insulin to keep your sugar levels and metabolism normal.

If you have persistent high blood sugar levels over a long period of time, diabetes can damage your:

  • Eyes (diabetic retinopathy).
  • Kidneys (diabetic nephropathy).
  • Nerves (diabetic neuropathy).
  • Heart (leading to heart attacks).
  • Blood vessels (leading to strokes and poor circulation in your legs).

If you keep your blood sugar level within a normal to near-normal range, you may prevent, or at least delay, these complications. Children seem protected from developing these complications during childhood. But when they become adolescents, their risk begins to increase. Keeping blood sugar levels as close to normal as possible at the beginning of the disease will help prevent these complications.3

What Increases Your Risk

Risk factors for developing type 1 diabetes include:

  • Family history of type 1 diabetes. Having a family history of the disease increases the chance that you will develop antibodies to the insulin-making cells in the pancreas. But it does not mean that you will develop diabetes. Only about 10% to 15% of people with type 1 diabetes have a family history of the disease.2
    • If the father has the disease, a child has a 6% risk of developing it.
    • If a sibling has the disease, a child has a 5% risk of developing it.
    • If the mother has the disease, a child has a 2% risk of developing it.
    • If an identical twin has the disease, the other twin has a 30% to 50% risk of developing it.
    • If a parent and one sibling have the disease, a child has a 30% risk of developing it.
  • Race. White people have a greater risk for developing type 1 diabetes than blacks, Asians, or Hispanics.
  • Presence of islet cell antibodies in the blood. People who have both a family history of type 1 diabetes and islet cell antibodies in their blood are likely to develop the disease. Family members of people with type 1 diabetes can be tested to see if they have islet cell antibodies. People who are found to have islet cell antibodies may be able to participate in studies about preventing type 1 diabetes.
  • Certain viral infections during childhood. A child who has enterovirus infections, particularly Coxsackie B infections, has a risk almost 6 times greater than other children for developing type 1 diabetes. But this does not mean that the child will definitely develop the disease.

When To Call a Doctor

Call 911 or other emergency services immediately if you or your child is:

Call a doctor immediately if you or your child is vomiting and cannot keep down liquids and:

  • Your blood sugar is 300 mg/dL or higher.
  • Your child’s blood sugar is 250 mg/dL or higher.

Call a doctor if you or your child:

  • Is sick for more than 2 days (unless it is a mild illness, such as a cold), and you or your child:
    • Has been vomiting or had diarrhea for more than 6 hours.
    • Has followed the doctor's advice but it has not worked. Learn what to do when you are sick and have diabetes.
    • Has blood sugar levels that are often above 300 mg/dL and urine tests for ketones show more than 2+ or moderate or higher ketones.
  • Has a blood sugar level that stays below the target range after eating some quick-sugar food.
  • Has a blood sugar level that stays high after taking a missed dose of insulin or taking an extra dose of insulin (if prescribed by the doctor).
  • Has frequent problems with high or low blood sugar levels. The insulin dose or schedule may need to be changed.
  • Is having difficulty knowing when blood sugar is low (hypoglycemia unawareness).
  • Has problems following the meal plan or getting physical activity, and you want help.

Watchful Waiting

Watchful waiting is not appropriate if you or your child with type 1 diabetes is losing consciousness and has high or low blood sugar. High and low blood sugar levels need treatment early so that the level does not continue to rise or drop and cause an emergency situation.

Watchful waiting is not appropriate if you or your child with diabetes is frequently having high or low blood sugar levels. The insulin type, dose, or schedule may need changing.

Who To See

Health professionals who can treat type 1 diabetes include:

More Information:

To prepare for your appointment, see the topic Making the Most of Your Appointment.

Exams and Tests

Routine tests

Routine tests for type 1 diabetes include a hemoglobin A1c or similar test (glycosylated hemoglobin or glycohemoglobin) that estimates your average blood sugar level over the previous 2 to 3 months. It helps monitor blood sugar control after treatment has started.

You need to see your doctor about every 3 to 6 months throughout your life for exams and tests to monitor your condition and adjust your treatment.

For more information, see the schedule for exams and tests beginning at diagnosis.

After you have had diabetes for 3 to 5 years, you will need annual tests to watch for signs of damage to your eyes (diabetic retinopathy), kidneys (diabetic nephropathy), heart, blood vessels, and nerves (diabetic neuropathy). If your child has diabetes, this testing should begin at puberty.

Other tests

You may need a thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) test when type 1 diabetes is diagnosed and then every 1 to 2 years. This test checks for thyroid problems, which are common among people with diabetes.

If you are very ill

You may have found out that you have type 1 diabetes when your insulin levels dropped very low and you were admitted to a hospital for diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). The following tests were likely used to diagnose and monitor treatment of ketoacidosis. You may have these tests again if you develop DKA in the future.

  • Chemistry screen, arterial blood gases, and other blood tests, to check your blood sugar (glucose) level, levels of electrolytes in the blood, other potential causes of acidosis, and general state of health
  • Urinalysis, to check whether high amounts of ketones and sugar (glucose) are in your urine

More Information:

Treatment Overview

The focus of your treatment for type 1 diabetes is to keep your blood sugar level within a normal or near-normal range. This is called tight control. It is the best way to reduce your risk of diabetes complications. But some people—such as those whose blood sugar drops too low with tight control—may need to set a different target range with their doctor.

A normal to near-normal blood sugar level is 70 mg/dL to 130 mg/dL before eating or less than 180 mg/dL 1 to 2 hours after eating. It also may be measured as a hemoglobin A1c of 6% or less (normal) to 7% (near normal). This is a test of your blood sugar control for the past 2 to 3 months.

To keep your blood sugar as close to normal as possible, your daily treatment includes:

Chronic illnesses such as diabetes take a toll on your energy and emotions. It's normal to feel down sometimes. But if you feel seriously overwhelmed, tearful, and not yourself, you may be suffering from depression. Talk to your doctor if you feel depressed. Medicine, counseling, and other support can help you.

How often will I see my doctor?

At first, you will keep in close touch with your doctor while you are trying to find the right dose of insulin that best keeps your blood sugar levels within your target range. After your blood sugar levels are staying within this range, you will continue to see your doctor about every 3 to 6 months. During these checkups, your doctor will evaluate and adjust your treatment. You will also start having exams and tests that check your blood sugar control and monitor your condition on a regular basis.

After you have had diabetes for 3 to 5 years, you will start having yearly exams and tests to monitor for signs of complications, particularly eye and kidney damage. If your child has diabetes, this testing should begin at puberty.

What if I have diabetic ketoacidosis?

If your blood sugar level was very high at the time you were diagnosed with diabetes, you may have been treated for diabetic ketoacidosis. This life-threatening condition can happen to you again if you do not take enough insulin, have a severe infection or other illness, or become severely dehydrated. Treatment for diabetic ketoacidosis requires hospitalization and includes:4

  • Fluids given through a vein (intravenous, or IV), to replace body fluids lost from dehydration and to correct the electrolyte imbalance.
  • Frequent monitoring of blood pressure, heart rate (pulse), breathing rate (respirations), and level of consciousness.
  • Frequent blood tests for glucose and electrolytes.
  • Insulin given through the IV fluid. After blood sugar levels are closer to your target range and you are no longer dehydrated, you can have insulin injected under the skin (subcutaneous).

Will I need treatment during the honeymoon period?

If your blood sugar levels return to the normal range soon after diagnosis, you are in what is called the "honeymoon period." This is a time when the remaining insulin-producing cells in your pancreas are working harder to supply enough insulin for your body. Treatment during this time may include:

  • Keeping in close touch with your doctor.
  • Monitoring your blood sugar level frequently to see whether it is rising.
  • Taking very small amounts of insulin or no insulin. Even though you may not need insulin, some doctors prefer that you take small doses of insulin daily throughout the honeymoon period. This may decrease the stress on the pancreas. It may also help prevent your child with diabetes from thinking that the disease is gone.

More Information:

What To Think About

When your child has diabetes

Talk with your child's teachers and the staff at his or her school (or child care center) to develop a plan for diabetes care at school. This plan needs to include clear instructions for dealing with low blood sugar, when to test the child's blood sugar, contents of school meals and snacks, and emergency contact information.

Allow your child with diabetes to participate in his or her daily care to the extent that is appropriate for your child's age and development. For example, your 4-year-old child cannot be responsible for testing his or her blood sugar but can get out the supplies and perform some of the simpler steps. By the time your child is an adolescent, he or she should be able to take responsibility for his or her diabetes care, with appropriate supervision. For more information, see the topic Type 1 Diabetes: Children Living With the Disease.

Coping with the disease

You (or your child) have just been diagnosed with a disease that requires daily attention and will last for the rest of your life. It is difficult to accept and adjust to all the lifestyle changes that you need to make, such as eating the right amount of carbohydrate at each meal and snack, giving injections every day, and coping with blood sugar variations.

Anger, resentment, or denial are normal feelings in these circumstances and can be expected because you are experiencing the loss of what your life was like before you got type 1 diabetes. Allow yourself time to deal with your feelings and grieve your loss. For more information, see the topic Grief and Grieving.

Prevention

Wear medical identification

Wear medical identification at all times. If you have an accident or you are taken to a hospital, this identification lets people know that you have diabetes so that they can care for you appropriately. You can buy medical identification in bracelets, necklaces, or other forms of jewelry at your local pharmacy.

Prevent high and low blood sugar emergencies

Blood sugar usually rises above a normal or near-normal range slowly, but it can lead to a life-threatening emergency unless it is treated promptly. Your blood sugar is likely to rise when you are sick. For more information, see guidelines for when you are sick.

Click here to view an Actionset. Diabetes: Preventing high blood sugar emergencies
Click here to view an Actionset. Diabetes in children: Preventing high blood sugar

Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) can develop very quickly. It can lead to a life-threatening emergency if it is not treated quickly. Low blood sugar can be especially dangerous if you drive. Do not drive if your blood sugar level is below 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). Take precautions when you are driving, and be prepared to stop and treat low blood sugar.

Click here to view an Actionset. Diabetes: Dealing with low blood sugar from insulin
Click here to view an Actionset. Diabetes in children: Preventing low blood sugar

Having a routine (when you eat, exercise, take your insulin, and check your blood sugar at about the same time every day) can also help prevent high and low blood sugar emergencies. When you have a routine, your blood sugar levels may be more predictable. A routine will also help you to remember to check your blood sugar and give yourself your insulin injections.

Preventing soreness and infection at injection sites

You can prevent soreness and infection at your injection sites by:

  • Varying the place where you give your injections. See the picture of injection sites.
  • Washing your hands before preparing and giving an injection.
  • Cleaning the injection area with a piece of cotton dipped in alcohol or with a commercial alcohol wipe.
  • Not using needles that are bent or have been reused several times.

Home Treatment

Your daily routine now includes new tasks and safety measures because you have type 1 diabetes. You can help keep your blood sugar levels as close to normal as possible by following a routine. This means testing your blood sugar and eating at regular times. It also means consistently eating about the same amount of food every day. There is a lot to learn about this complex disease, but for now concentrate on these critical steps:

Spread carbohydrate throughout the day

Carbohydrate is the one nutrient in your diet that most affects blood sugar levels. A registered dietitian can help you learn about what foods contain carbohydrate and how to manage it in your diet. If your child has diabetes, talk with the dietitian about how to adjust meals and snacks for your child's varying appetite.

Click here to view an Actionset. Diabetes: Counting carbs if you use insulin
Click here to view an Actionset. Diabetes: Using a food guide

Take insulin

You need to take injections every day because your pancreas no longer produces insulin. Eventually, your child can learn to give an insulin injection. Talk to your doctor and your child to find out when is a good time to start teaching your child to give an insulin injection.

Click here to view an Actionset. Diabetes: Giving yourself an insulin shot
Click here to view an Actionset. Diabetes in children: Giving insulin shots to a child

Check your blood sugar often

Your doctor will want you to test your blood sugar level several times a day.

Click here to view an Actionset. Diabetes: Checking your blood sugar
Click here to view an Actionset. Diabetes in children: Checking blood sugar in a child

Exercise regularly

Try to do moderate activity at least 2½ hours a week.5 One way to do this is to be active 30 minutes a day, at least 5 days a week. Some tips for exercising safely may help. It may also help to keep track of your exercise on an activity log(What is a PDF document?) .

Encourage your child to do moderate to vigorous activity at least 1 hour every day. It’s okay for them to be active in smaller blocks of time that add up to 1 hour or more each day. Children with type 1 diabetes can participate in sports just like children without diabetes. But children who use insulin are at risk of low blood sugar. Some tips on safe exercising for your child with type 1 diabetes can help prevent low blood sugar.

Limit alcohol

In addition to exercising, it is a good idea to limit the amount of alcohol you drink. The American Diabetes Association recommends that women with diabetes have no more than one drink a day and men with diabetes have no more than two drinks a day.6 One drink is 12 fl oz (0.4 L) of beer, 5 fl oz (0.2 L) of wine, or 1.5 fl oz (44.4 mL) liquor.

Quit smoking

Tobacco has many bad health effects, especially for people with diabetes. Having type 1 diabetes can cause a lot of problems in your body. Smoking can make many of these problems worse, especially heart and blood vessel disease. Smoking raises your cholesterol and makes it harder for your body to heal. No matter how long you've smoked, your health will improve after you quit. For help quitting, see the topic Quitting Smoking.

More Information

Medications

Insulin is used to treat type 1 diabetes. There are several different types of insulin, and most people with type 1 diabetes need a combination of long-acting and short-acting insulins.

Never skip a dose of insulin without the advice of your doctor. Know:

  • The dose of each type of insulin you are taking.
  • The daily schedule for your insulin injections. Usually people with type 1 diabetes take a long-acting insulin once or twice a day and a short-acting insulin with meals.
  • How long it takes for each type of insulin to start working (onset), when it will have its greatest effect (peak), and how long it will work (duration). See a table that shows this information about types of insulin.
  • How to prepare and give an insulin injection.
    Click here to view an Actionset.Diabetes: Giving yourself an insulin shot

More Information:

Surgery

There are no surgical treatments for recently diagnosed type 1 diabetes.

Other Treatment

Avoid products that promise a “cure” for diabetes. No such cure exists. If you have questions about a product for diabetes, check with your local American Diabetes Association office, your doctor, or a diabetes educator.

Other types of meal plans

You may hear of people with diabetes following meal plans other than carbohydrate counting, or using low glycemic-index foods to prevent high blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia) after meals. Talk with a registered dietitian before choosing an alternate meal-planning method for your or your child's diabetes diet.

Complementary therapies

Complementary therapies, such as acupuncture or biofeedback, may help relieve stress and muscle tension and improve your overall well-being and quality of life. Talk with your doctor if you are using any complementary or alternative therapies, including chiropractic therapy and osteopathy.

Studies indicate that soluble fiber may help people with type 1 diabetes keep blood sugar levels within a normal or near-normal range. Other herbal medicines and natural substances, such as antioxidants, vanadium, magnesium, or chromium, may be helpful also. Talk with your doctor about any herbal or natural products that you are taking or that you want to take.

References

Citations

  1. Devendra D, et al. (2004). Type 1 diabetes: Recent developments. BMJ, 328(7442): 750–754.
  2. Lawson ML, Muirhead SE (2001). What is type 1 diabetes? In HC Gerstein, RB Haynes, eds., Evidence-Based Diabetes Care, pp. 124–150. Hamilton, ON: BC Decker.
  3. Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT)/Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (EDIC) Research Group (2001). Beneficial effects of intensive therapy of diabetes during adolescence: Outcomes after the conclusion of the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT). Journal of Pediatrics, 139(6): 804–812.
  4. American Diabetes Association (2004). Hyperglycemic crises in diabetes. Clinical Practice Recommendations 2004. Diabetes Care, 27(Suppl 1): S94–S102.
  5. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (2008). 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans (ODPHP Publication No. U0036). Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office. Available online: http://www.health.gov/paguidelines/pdf/paguide.pdf.
  6. American Diabetes Association (2008). Standards of medical care in diabetes. Clinical Practice Recommendations 2008. Diabetes Care, 31(Suppl 1): S12–S54.

Other Works Consulted

  • American Diabetes Association (2004). Dyslipidemia management in adults with diabetes. Clinical Practice Recommendations 2004. Diabetes Care, 27(Suppl 1): S68–S71.
  • American Diabetes Association (2006). Pancreas and islet transplantation in type 1 diabetes. Position statement. Diabetes Care, 29(4): 935.
  • Anderson JW (2006). Diabetes mellitus: Medical nutrition therapy. In ME Shils et al., eds., Modern Nutrition in Health and Disease, 10th ed., pp. 1043–1066. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins.
  • Campbell A (2006). Glycaemic control in type 1 diabetes, search date December 2005. Online version of BMJ Clinical Evidence. Also available online: http://www.clinicalevidence.com.
  • Campbell AP, Beaser RS (2007). Designing a conventional insulin treatment program. In RS Beaser et al., eds., Joslin's Diabetes Deskbook, pp. 281–323. Boston: Joslin Diabetes Center.
  • Campbell AP, Beaser RS (2007). Medical nutrition therapy. In RS Beaser et al., eds., Joslin's Diabetes Deskbook, pp. 81–125. Boston: Joslin Diabetes Center.
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2005). National Diabetes Fact Sheet: General Information and National Estimates on Diabetes in the United States, 2005. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Available online: http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-statistics.jsp.
  • Chalmers KH (2005). Medical nutrition therapy. In Joslin's Diabetes Mellitus, 14th ed., pp. 611–631. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins.
  • Cheng AYY, Zinman B (2005). Principles of insulin therapy. In CR Kahn et al., eds., Joslin's Diabetes Mellitus, 14th ed., pp. 659–670. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins.
  • Goguen JM, Leiter LA (2001). Alternative therapy: The role of selected minerals, vitamins, fiber, and herbs in treating hyperglycemia. In HC Gerstein, RB Haynes, eds., Evidence-Based Diabetes Care, pp. 295–322. Hamilton, ON: BC Decker.
  • Hviid A, et al. (2004). Childhood vaccination and type 1 diabetes. New England Journal of Medicine, 350(14): 1398–1404.
  • Ludwig DS (2002). The glycemic index: Physiological mechanisms relating to obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. JAMA, 287(18): 2414–2423.
  • Pickup J, Keen H (2002). Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion at 25 years. Diabetes Care, 25(30): 593–598.
  • Weir GC (2005). Pancreas and islet transplantation. In Joslin's Diabetes Mellitus, 14th ed., pp. 757–776. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins.

Credits

Author Caroline Rea, RN, BS, MS
Editor Susan Van Houten, RN, BSN, MBA
Associate Editor Pat Truman, MATC
Primary Medical Reviewer Caroline S. Rhoads, MD - Internal Medicine
Specialist Medical Reviewer Matthew I. Kim, MD - Endocrinology & Metabolism
Last Updated September 24, 2008

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